Holenderski pilot pokazuje na Instagramie jak wygląda jego praca

Zdjęcie zorzy polarnej, a obok zdjęcie pilota

Zastanawialiście się kiedyś, jak to jest być pilotem i pracować kilkadziesiąt kilometrów powyżej powierzchni ziemi? Teraz możecie poczuć namiastkę tego, czego doświadcza na co dzień pilot w swojej pracy.

34-letni Christiaan van Heijst, holenderski pilot z 20-letnim doświadczeniem postanowił podzielić się widokami ze swojej pracy z szerszą publicznością, zakładając konto na Instagramie.

Efektem tego są przepiękne zdjęcia zachodów słońca, zorzy polarnej, czy nawet fotografie przedstawiające jak wygląda burza ponad chmurami. Nie wiemy, na ile legalnie jest co prawda kierować samolotem i robić jednocześnie zdjęcia, ale mimo to, jak dla nas to są najlepsze #skyporn, jakie tylko zobaczycie!

Cruising into a slow stratospheric sunset, a SilkWay West 747 is approaching us from the opposite direction. Two lone rogues of the forgotten and rougher part of aviation, the freighter industry. Accompanied but nothing but the moon and sunlit clouds around us, we pass each other silently. Colleagues I'll probably come across in a dodgy bar in Baku or Anchorage, sharing stories and laughs while silently knowing we belong to a tight-knit group of pilots who live in a separate world within the aviation industry. A world with unique routes, adventures and long times from home. Its a lifestyle most of us prefer over the polished and glamorous world of regular airline flying. #flying #flight #avgeek #aviationdaily #aviation #aviationgeek #boeing #boeing747 #boeinglovers #contrail #sunset #moon #sky #skyporn

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Just two hours ago; a nearly full moon over Iraq. For the first time in roughly 6 years I'm overflying the beautiful North-Iraqi mountains again and the lunar light certainly added to it. Iraqi airspace was closed for a long time, following the fighting and turmoil caused by the IS-invasion heavy fighting that followed. These mountains are part of a roughly defined area where the majority of the inhabitants are ethnic Kurds and covers some areas of Turkey, Iraq and Iran. Apart from the fierce discussions, fighting and tension of this area its a delight to see the landscape in its full glory once again. Countless of small villages light up in the middle of snow-covered mountains, beautiful valleys and the flow of moonlight adds a true mystical 1001 night atmosphere to it. #iraq #iran #moonlight #landscape #landscapes #landscapelover #moonlight #world

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No matter how many times I see the northern lights, it always fills me with excitement and awe when the dancing curtains of light and colours start to appear. Sometimes a dim green blur, other times a lightshow with a size, intensity and speed that will simply leave you breathless. Flying many northern routes across Alaska and Canada, I find myself often enjoying this show that stays hidden for anybody below the clouds. Just a handful of pilots enjoying it from their comfortable cockpit, disconnected from the earth and suspended between the clouds and heavens above. A private show of nature that extends far into space even higher than the altitude of the International Space Station, I can only dream of seeing it from an even higher perspective. #aurora #auroraborealis #northernlights #window #windowview #pilotlife #worldshotz #aviation #avgeek #flying #flight @world_shotz @instagramaviation @natgeosky

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Over 300 British tourists that spent the holidays in Phuket, one of the most idyllic and beautiful tropical islands in the world, passing by on their way back home. White sandy beaches, palm trees and a cocktail in one hand enjoying the peaceful beauty of their tropical vacation. Below them are the barren and war-torn mountains of central-Afghanistan for as far as the eye can see. The contrast couldn't have been any larger and most of them are probably completely ignorant of what part of the world they are overflying. Window blinds shut, crying children, watching movies or dozing off. The tropical blue color of this TUI 767 illustrates the contrast with the brown country below even further. Without any of them knowing it, a Boeing 747-8 freighter is passing over their heads in the opposite direction, roughly 1900km/h difference of speed and 300 meters higher. In that freighter, a copilot glued to his windows and enjoying the view over this unique country and immortalizing their passage. #afghanistan #tui #tuifly #aircraft #airplane #aviation #avgeek #aviationdaily #aviationgeek #air2air #landscape #aerial #pilotlife #photo #photography #instadaily #instapic @aviapics4u @instagramaviation @tuiuk @tuinederland

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A first real try with my new Nikon D850 camera to see if it would actually do a better job compared to my 4 year old D800. Flying over the Pacific Ocean, hundreds of miles away from landfall and not even the slightest bit of moonlight to illuminate the world and clouds beneath us. Just the light of the stars and the faint earth glow from the atmosphere. Apart from the technical side of this photo, it always surprises me how much light the stars alone actually give. When flying so far from any man-made lights like cities or roads on the ground, it's incredible what you can see when you let your eyes adjust to the low level of light. All the lights in the cockpit dimmed to the lowest level and let the eyes adjust for at least 30-45 minutes and you'll start to see the contours of the clouds and other faint features just by the light of the stars. It always reminds me of the breathtaking stories of WW1 (bomber) pilots who were sent up into the night sky. Just a few years after the first manned flight, young men were sent up with no knowledge about spatial disorientation, navigation or aerodynamics, except for a few costly lessons in the months and years before. In the beginning they were mere suicide missions and the pilots were not expected to survive the perils of night flights. If they managed to come back and on top of that land the airplane instead of crashing it somewhere in the ground, it was a nice bonus. Without any means of navigation except looking at the ground and trying to 'keep the stars above', many actually started to manage and found they could actually see a lot of features on the ground simply by using the light of the stars. Coasts and rivers became easily recognized and after a while even landing without the help of any lights or guidance became relatively easy using nothing but the light of the stars. For this shot, I used the Nikkor 10.5mm f/2.8 lens and placed it on the glareshield in front of me, just against the window. A 20-second exposure, aperture f/2.8 and an ISO (sensor sensitivity) of 2500. The result is stunning and beyond my expectations. This photo is raw file as it is. 2nd is a 100% crop to show the actual noise.

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Winter is coming… last week over Luxembourg on an exceptionally clear day. Coming in from Germany, we slowly make our descend into the airport of Luxembourg. Passing through 20.000ft, we are offered a wonderful view over the Northern part the country that received the first touches of snow the night before. When I flew out of Luxembourg last week the country was still green and lavish, now it looks like some giant has been playing around with some powder sugar. Unfortunately my car turned into a solid chunk of ice and the roads through the Ardennes are not so much fun to drive in this kind of weather. At least the views make up for that! #Luxembourg #luxembourgcity #winter #winterwonderland #snow #landscape #aerial #landscapephotography #ardennes #photoaday #photodaily #instaphoto #

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St Elmo’s fire. Somewhere over the Atlantic between South-America and Africa we encountered a huge front of active thunderstorms. Flying in thick clouds with zero visibility, we had to rely on our weather-radar to get a clear image of the weather ahead. It was obvious that there was no way to fly all around this squall line of entangled thunderstorms that stretched across our route for hundreds of miles to either side. Coming closer, the radar provided us with a more detailed image of the interior of the clouds ahead, enabling us to plan a route through this maze of violent weather. This time though, we immediately understood that we won’t get away with a smooth passage. The storms had almost grown together into one, forcing us to find the ‘least’ violent spot to fly through. Our long range HF-radio was already rendered completely useless with the nearby storms that charge the atmosphere and our airplane, thereby blocking all signals to and from the outside…. Full blog can be read here; https://jpcvanheijst.com/blogs/2017/06/574544-st-elmo-s-fire-4-minute-read #stelmosfire #elmosfire #aircraft #airplane #boeing #boeing747 #747 #cockpit #flightdeck #pilot #piloteye #pilotlife #thunderstorm #cloud #cloudporn #instaweather #instaflight #instagramaviation #instaaviation #aviation #flight #avgeek #instadaily #photodaily #photoaday #photography #nature #jpcvanheijst #nikon

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Holenderski pilot pokazuje na Instagramie jak wygląda jego praca
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